Trauma Treatment

Two definitions of trauma types:

“T” Traumas:

These include traumas such as sexual assault, physical abuse, domestic violence, combat related trauma, and other life-threatening injuries or events. Additionally, it can include threats to commit acts of this nature or witnessing such acts.

“t” TRAUMAS:

These traumas are events that are highly distressing, emotionally taxing, and cause intense and lasting emotional, physical and mental effects. With t traumas, it s important to not look necessarily at the event itself, but at the effect that the event has on the individual. For example, when you are a victim of emotional invalidation, neglect, verbal abuse from family members, if this causes you distress, emotional invalidation, and you experience an intense reaction to this and it continues to happen It is a t trauma

Neither T or t traumas is worse than the other Both experiences of trauma are valid, real and result in the development of symptoms of PTSD/C-PTSD and both can cause the same level of distress in someone

Vicarious Trauma

When you are a witness of trauma whether via personal proximity (not being abused yourself, but witnessing or knowing of another family member being abused) or working with (such as counselors, ER workers, doctors, etc.) or as we ve
seen in recent years through seeing acts of violence against others (e.g. police brutality) you may also experience trauma responses. This is called experiencing vicarious trauma. This can have the same lasting effects as T traumas.

What PTSD might look like:

Avoidance

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Intrusive Memories/Flashbacks

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Nightmares related to the trauma

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Persistent fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame

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Persistent inability to experience positive emotions.

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Exaggerated startle response

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Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities

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Inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic events

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Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world (e.g., “I am bad, “No one can be trusted, The world is completely dangerous”).

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Hypervigilance

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Problems with concentration

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Reckless or self-destructive behavior

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Irritable or aggressive behavior

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Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others

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Dissociation

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Difficulty falling or staying asleep, feeling unrested from sleep

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Persistent, distorted blame of self or others about the cause or consequences of the traumatic event

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Complex PTSD (CPTSD) is PTSD with additional symptoms such as:

Difficulty controlling your emotions

Constant feelings of emptiness orhopelessness

Feeling very hostile or distrustful towards the world

Feeling as if you are permanently damaged or worthless

Feeling as if you are completely different to other people

Feeling as if you are permanently damaged or worthless

You are more likely to develop C-PTSD with:

You experienced trauma at an early age

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You experienced repeated traumas over a prolonged period of time

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You have experienced multiple traumas

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Treatments we provide for trauma include: